Educational Prosperity: Looking Beyond Equality to Equity

By J. Douglas Willms, President of The Learning Bar Inc

The educational prosperity framework that I introduced in a recent blog provides an essential structure for understanding the holistic and cumulative ways that children develop, learn and thrive. The benefits of the framework are hardly theoretical: they provide an important and practical guide for ways that monitoring data can—and should—be used to create smarter and more effective policies to help young people thrive.  Continue reading

The Educational Prosperity Framework: Helping Countries Provide Foundational Learning for All

By J. Douglas Willms, President of The Learning Bar Inc

To honour World Teachers Day, this blog presents an assessment framework, called Education Prosperity, that can be used to track the success of teachers, families, communities and public institutions in developing children’s cognitive skills and their social, emotional, physical and spiritual well-being. Continue reading

New Data Reveal that Poor Youth Are Among the Most Vulnerable to Bullying

By Silvia Montoya, Director of the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS)
This blog was also published by the Global Partnership for Education (GPE).

Almost one-third of young teens worldwide have recently experienced bullying, according to data published for the first time by the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS). The data are part of a major new release of 32 global and thematic indicators to monitor progress towards Sustainable Development Goal 4 (SDG 4), which included the updating of the UIS global education database for the school year ending in 2017. Continue reading

No Time to Lose on the Road to Universal Primary and Secondary Education

By Silvia Montoya, Director of the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS)
This blog was also published by the GPE

The latest figures on out-of-school-children are disappointing, showing progress that is – at best – painfully slow.

Despite every promise and declaration, and all the genuine efforts made to date, there are still around 262 million – or one out of every five – children, adolescents and youth between the ages of 6-17 out of school. That figure rises to a shocking one in three children out of school in the world’s poorest countries. What’s worse is that new data from the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS) show that progress has stalled, with the rates and the numbers remaining more or less static for years.  Continue reading

DFID Announces Continued Support to the Global Education Monitoring Report and the UNESCO Institute for Statistics

By Sarah Hennell, Department for International Development (DFID), UK

The UK is leading the call for 12 years of quality education for all girls and boys.  But is it possible to measure the quality of education for all children? Is it feasible to track progress? We think so, and I want to explain why and how the UK is supporting this work. Continue reading

We Can Revolutionise Learning by Making Wise Use of Data

By Silvia Montoya, Director of the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS)

I am looking forward to this week’s WISE event in New York, which will bring together practitioners and thought-leaders determined to empower learners for future challenges. How? By innovating inside and outside the classroom to help current and future generations reach their full potential. Continue reading

Meet the SDG 4 Data: Indicators on School Conditions, Scholarships and Teachers

By Silvia Montoya, Director of the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS)
This blog was also published by the Global Partnership for Education (GPE)

Learn more about SDG 4 Indicators 4.a.1, 4.b.1 and 4.c.1

The blogs in this series have examined the indicators that measure progress towards the achievement of Sustainable Development Goal 4 (SDG 4), from learning outcomes to education that promotes sustainable development. In this final blog, however, we focus on three indicators on some key ingredients to ensure a quality education for all. First, the availability of schools where children can learn in safety. Second, the availability of scholarships for talented students. Third – and very importantly – the availability of trained teachers. Continue reading